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The Most Common Ways Burglars Enter the Home

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Burglary is one of those things that many people assume will never happen to them, but when it does it can be a traumatic experience. Unfortunately, there are too many people out there looking to take advantage of homeowners who believe they aren’t at risk from a burglary, and it’s much simpler to break into a home than many people might think.

While movies show scenes with elaborate break-ins and daring heists, most burglaries are much simpler and quicker. Here are the ways most burglars get into homes...

The Front Door
Many people think a burglar would never be brazen enough to simply walk through the front door, but it is one of the most common entry points for thieves. Seasoned burglars know exactly where to look for the spare key that you’ve “hidden,” and if they know you’re not home, many thieves will simply kick in the door or remove it from its hinges. About 40% of completed break-ins involve forced entry, but 32% of burglaries were through an unlocked door.

People commonly forget to lock their doors, or have a key within easy reach of the lock, making the front door a surprisingly common target for burglars.

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Windows
Windows are the most fragile point of entry in most homes, and many homeowners think of this as a potential safeguard against burglars. But unfortunately, the sound of breaking glass is unlikely to catch the attention of a neighbor; most people will ignore the sound of a window breaking if they only hear it once. But sometimes, a burglar doesn’t even have to break a window to get through it. Many windows are simply left unlatched or do not have strong enough locks to keep a determined burglar out.

Windows are also commonly shielded by tall vegetation or privacy fences, which help give you privacy but also provide a convenient shield for a thief to hide behind. Keeping shrubs and vegetation trimmed can remove cover for a would-be burglar.

Climbable Trees or Tables
While some vegetation can keep burglars away from the eyes of neighbors, some plants can provide a burglar a direct path into your home. Even if you are diligent about locking windows on the lower-level of your house, most people are not as careful with upstairs windows – especially your children. Tall trees or even outdoor tables can provide easy access to the second story of your home, and access to a room. And remember, all it takes is one unlocked door or window for a burglar to get into your home, so be aware of any exterior items that could be used to gain entry to your house.

Secondary Doors
Although the front door is one of the most common entry points for a burglar, a would-be thief will test every possible opening for a way inside. This includes side doors, garage doors, skylights and more. Don’t neglect an entry because you don’t use it often, because a criminal will absolutely take advantage of any unlocked door or window.

Protect Yourself
The fact of the matter is, the only way to truly protect your belongings when you’re not home is to install and maintain a custom home security system. A monitored alarm system can scare burglars off the scene with exterior cameras and other visible measures, and offers a last line of defense and alert if someone should attempt to break into your home.

Since you can’t protect your home all the time, it’s okay to lean on a trusted partner to keep you and your family safe. Crime Prevention Security Systems has years of experience protecting homes and offices in Orlando and Gainesville. Contact us today to see how we can help protect your home.

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